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GOLF: Statewide Reports
Wire reports
editor@wvrsn.com
September 7, 2011

golf- brittany lincicome1
Brittany Lincicome - Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty

Statewide tournament hopes to get ball rolling on girls golf

Golf- Greenbr clas. logo September 5, 2011 Statewide tournament hopes to get ball rolling on girls golf Jim Jamieson's life was transformed when he received a golf scholarship to Oklahoma State. By Tommy R. Atkinson The Charleston Gazette Chip Ellis Elizabeth McIntyre pitches to the 16th green at Little Creek as Nitro teammates (from left) Kelli Douglas, Anna Rubenstein and Lindsay Klemm watch.Advertiser Jim Jamieson's life was transformed when he received a golf scholarship to Oklahoma State.

"It opened a lot of doors,'' said the University of Charleston first-year women's golf coach, who earned All-America status and helped the Cowboys to their first national championship in 1963.

"I had aspirations of playing on the [PGA] Tour and if I was able to compete for Oklahoma State, that would give me some indication.''

Jamieson hopes to give girls in West Virginia that same opportunity. He has organized the inaugural West Virginia Girls Golf Invitational on Sept. 17 for all high school female golfers in the state at Glade Springs Resort in Daniels.

The one-day event will provide instruction by PGA teaching professionals, offer girls an overview of golf scholarship opportunities at the NCAA Division I, II and III, NAIA and junior college levels and allow them to compete against one another in an 18-hole tournament.

"We will expand their horizons,'' said Jamieson, who had a 10-year career on the PGA Tour and now works as the golf instructor at Glade Springs Resort. "I think that will be a great experience.''

When Jamieson became the head coach for the Golden Eagles, he quickly learned that the 80 or so scholarships available at West Virginia Conference schools for women's golf go unfilled, weren't going to girls in West Virginia or weren't going to those who even played the sport.

He said women's golf teams in the WVC are sometimes filled out with athletes from other sports, such as women's basketball.

"We have to go out of state or out of the country to fill these scholarships,'' he said. "West Virginia's not giving these girls an opportunity.''

Golf is about the only high school sport in West Virginia where boys and girls still compete on the same team (wrestling being another), which has led to fewer and fewer females participating. In Kanawha and Putnam counties combined, there are only 10 girls competing at the high school level.

The few girls that do play are often left off the varsity squad because their scores don't stack up to their male counterparts and thus they can only practice. The girls miss out on playing in prestigious regular-season tournaments, regionals and the state tournament.

"They don't have a separate division, so girls don't have an opportunity to learn and compete,'' said Nitro second-year golf coach Lloyd McIntyre. "If they're not very good at it, there's really not a place for them out there.

"It's kind of intimidating and that can be very discouraging. Last year I had kids making fun of my girls. I had a girl quit. A couple of times she came off the course crying. That's not the positive environment you want to have. Once you get three or four girls together, they bond and want to go out there and play.''

There are only six high schools in West Virginia that have girls programs. According to the Secondary School Activities Commission, there must be at least 21 schools with a least three girls per team before a separate state tournament can be contested.

"All over the state, it's kind of the same story,'' McIntyre said. "When my daughter played last year, she played with a girl one time from another school in 15 or 16 matches.''

Catholic coach Bill Gillispie said he has trouble finding matches for his five freshman girls and when he does, it's against boys teams.

Article Preview This article is available only to our premium digital content subscribers. Statewide tournament hopes to get ball rolling on girls golf Jim Jamieson's life was transformed when he received a golf scholarship to Oklahoma State.

"It opened a lot of doors,'' said the University of Charleston first-year women's golf coach, who earned All-America status and helped the Cowboys to their first national championship in 1963.

"I had aspirations of playing on the [PGA] Tour and if I was able to compete for Oklahoma State, that would give me some indication.''

Jamieson hopes to give girls in West Virginia that same opportunity. He has organized the inaugural West Virginia Girls Golf Invitational on Sept. 17 for all high school female golfers in the state at Glade Springs Resort in Daniels.

The one-day event will provide instruction by PGA teaching professionals, offer girls an overview of golf scholarship opportunities at the NCAA Division I, II and III, NAIA and junior college levels and allow them to compete against one another in an 18-hole tournament.

"We will expand their horizons,'' said Jamieson, who had a 10-year career on the PGA Tour and now works as the golf instructor at Glade Springs Resort. "I think that will be a great experience.''

When Jamieson became the head coach for the Golden Eagles, he quickly learned that the 80 or so scholarships available at West Virginia Conference schools for women's golf go unfilled, weren't going to girls in West Virginia or weren't going to those who even played the sport.

He said women's golf teams in the WVC are sometimes filled out with athletes from other sports, such as women's basketball.

"We have to go out of state or out of the country to fill these scholarships,'' he said. "West Virginia's not giving these girls an opportunity.''

Golf is about the only high school sport in West Virginia where boys and girls still compete on the same team (wrestling being another), which has led to fewer and fewer females participating. In Kanawha and Putnam counties combined, there are only 10 girls competing at the high school level.

The few girls that do play are often left off the varsity squad because their scores don't stack up to their male counterparts and thus they can only practice. The girls miss out on playing in prestigious regular-season tournaments, regionals and the state tournament.

"They don't have a separate division, so girls don't have an opportunity to learn and compete,'' said Nitro second-year golf coach Lloyd McIntyre. "If they're not very good at it, there's really not a place for them out there.

"It's kind of intimidating and that can be very discouraging. Last year I had kids making fun of my girls. I had a girl quit. A couple of times she came off the course crying. That's not the positive environment you want to have. Once you get three or four girls together, they bond and want to go out there and play.''

There are only six high schools in West Virginia that have girls programs. According to the Secondary School Activities Commission, there must be at least 21 schools with a least three girls per team before a separate state tournament can be contested.

"All over the state, it's kind of the same story,'' McIntyre said. "When my daughter played last year, she played with a girl one time from another school in 15 or 16 matches.''

Catholic coach Bill Gillispie said he has trouble finding matches for his five freshman girls and when he does, it's against boys teams.

Subscription Services 1 Day Online Only $0.99 Click here to purchase a one day subscription.1 Month Online Only $9.99 Click here to sign up for a one month subscription.1 Month Online + Print Delivery $31.99 Click here to sign up for our Premium subscription package.Jim Jamieson's life was transformed when he received a golf scholarship to Oklahoma State.

"It opened a lot of doors,'' said the University of Charleston first-year women's golf coach, who earned All-America status and helped the Cowboys to their first national championship in 1963.

"I had aspirations of playing on the [PGA] Tour and if I was able to compete for Oklahoma State, that would give me some indication.''

Jamieson hopes to give girls in West Virginia that same opportunity. He has organized the inaugural West Virginia Girls Golf Invitational on Sept. 17 for all high school female golfers in the state at Glade Springs Resort in Daniels.

The one-day event will provide instruction by PGA teaching professionals, offer girls an overview of golf scholarship opportunities at the NCAA Division I, II and III, NAIA and junior college levels and allow them to compete against one another in an 18-hole tournament.

"We will expand their horizons,'' said Jamieson, who had a 10-year career on the PGA Tour and now works as the golf instructor at Glade Springs Resort. "I think that will be a great experience.''

When Jamieson became the head coach for the Golden Eagles, he quickly learned that the 80 or so scholarships available at West Virginia Conference schools for women's golf go unfilled, weren't going to girls in West Virginia or weren't going to those who even played the sport.

He said women's golf teams in the WVC are sometimes filled out with athletes from other sports, such as women's basketball.

"We have to go out of state or out of the country to fill these scholarships,'' he said. "West Virginia's not giving these girls an opportunity.''

Golf is about the only high school sport in West Virginia where boys and girls still compete on the same team (wrestling being another), which has led to fewer and fewer females participating. In Kanawha and Putnam counties combined, there are only 10 girls competing at the high school level.

The few girls that do play are often left off the varsity squad because their scores don't stack up to their male counterparts and thus they can only practice. The girls miss out on playing in prestigious regular-season tournaments, regionals and the state tournament.

"They don't have a separate division, so girls don't have an opportunity to learn and compete,'' said Nitro second-year golf coach Lloyd McIntyre. "If they're not very good at it, there's really not a place for them out there.

"It's kind of intimidating and that can be very discouraging. Last year I had kids making fun of my girls. I had a girl quit. A couple of times she came off the course crying. That's not the positive environment you want to have. Once you get three or four girls together, they bond and want to go out there and play.''

There are only six high schools in West Virginia that have girls programs. According to the Secondary School Activities Commission, there must be at least 21 schools with a least three girls per team before a separate state tournament can be contested.

"All over the state, it's kind of the same story,'' McIntyre said. "When my daughter played last year, she played with a girl one time from another school in 15 or 16 matches.''

Catholic coach Bill Gillispie said he has trouble finding matches for his five freshman girls and when he does, it's against boys teams.

"It's hard to get matches for them because not a lot of teams have JV teams let alone a girls team,'' he said. "It's hard to keep them interested if they're playing the same two or three girls all the time.

"You can only go to the range and putt so many times before you want to play. Most of them are getting frustrated because they're not getting to play because they're just not at the level the boys are.''

McIntyre said prep coaches have tough decisions to make, which usually leave the girls on the outside looking in. Naturally, when coaches fill out their top varsity slots, they will use the players with the best scores.

"[The girls are] either going to be very, very good players or they're not going to play,'' he said. "They don't have any incentive.''

McIntyre said during this year's Kanawha County high school championship, the girls competed in their own division for the first time.

"We're trying to schedule some things where they can just play,'' he said. "The feedback has been overwhelming. I think it's starting to develop. My goal is to build awareness. There's college coaches calling all the time, 'Do you have any girls playing golf?' They're looking for opportunities to give these girls scholarships.''

"I do think we're right on the cutting edge of developing girls golf in West Virginia,'' added Gillispie. "I think we're close. [The girls] definitely show interest, it's just building up interest in the beginning girl golfer.''

The Top Flite Junior Tour is beginning to make some headway after more than 30 girls this summer competed on its youth tournament circuit.

"We see a lot of girls in the Top Flite Junior Tour,'' said Ken Tackett, the executive director of the West Virginia Golf Association.

"Scores are still a little high, but if you opened it up and had high school girls golf, there would be more participation because they wouldn't feel the competition of competing with boys at same time.''

Jamieson's PGA Tour highlights include winning the Western Open in 1972 and recording top-five finishes in the Masters and the PGA Championship, accomplishments he feels are a direct result of a college scholarship.

"We'd like to have the same opportunity [in West Virginia] that was given to me at Oklahoma State,'' he said.

Ryan Pritt contributed to this report. Reach Tommy R. Atkinson at tatkin...@wvgazette.com or 304-348-4811.

August 1, 2011 Swing shift: Rookie claims Greenbrier Classic By BRIAN WOODSON Bluefield Daily Telegraph The Bluefield Daily Telegraph Mon Aug 01, 2011, 05:00 AM EDT

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS  Seventy-two holes weren't enough to determine the Greenbrier Classic champion.

Seventy-three was.

Rookie Scott Stallings overcame a bogey on the 17th hole by making a birdie on 18 to fall into a three-man playoff, and then birdied the 18th again to claim the Greenbrier Classic at a crowded and muggy Old Course TPC Course on Sunday.

Stallings, a resident of Oak Ridge, Tenn., defeated Bob Estes and Bill Haas in the playoff. They both made par on the final hole, but Stallings hit his drive within seven feet of the hole and sank the putt for his first PGA Tour win.

"I had an opportunity to birdie 18 to get in a playoff and then to have the exact same shot ... ," Stallings said. "I actually put the ball on the same exact tee on the same spot during regulation and I used the same tee in the playoff. I also used the same ball."

His previous high finish had been third in March at the Transitions Championship in Tampa, Fla. He became the sixth rookie winner on tour this season.

"The Greenbrier has been absolutely incredible, the fans, the volunteers, everybody that put the tournament together, it has been absolutely phenomenal," Stallings said. "One of the best, if not the best tournament on tour and I can't wait to come back.

"To be champion of such a great event, it is a huge blessing and I will never forget it for sure."

The final trio finished regulation at 10-under 270, a full 12 strokes lower than the 22 under that Stuart Appleby recorded last year to win the inaugural Greenbrier Classic.

Estes had the day's lowest round with a 64, while Haas shot 67 and Stallings finished with a 69, setting up the 13th playoff on the tour this year.

It was nearly a much bigger playoff. Five others tied at 9-under 269, including second round co-leader Brendon de Jonge, Andres Romero, Cameron Tringale, Jimmy Walker and Gary Woodland. Romero's 65 was one stroke behind Estes for the best round of the day.

Third-round leader Anthony Kim followed Saturday's 62 with a 74, and finished in a four-way tie for 14th with, among others, first round pacesetter Trevor Immelman.

Stallings, who started the day in the final group with Kim, certainly didn't win easy. He had four bogeys to go out at four-over 38, but birdied six of the final nine holes, including three in a row at one point.

"I think this round was a tale of two nines," Stallings said. "The front nine I couldn't do anything right and the back nine it seemed like that I had pretty good control."

His bogey on 17 nearly cost him a spot in the playoff, but his drive on the 169-yard par 3, 18th hole left him a short putt for birdie. He made the seven-foot putt, and celebrated with a fist pump, while crediting his caddy, Josh Graham, with keeping him confident throughout the round.

"You have the par 3 and it is a birdie hole. It is a short iron to a receptive green and you can use the contours of the green to give yourself an opportunity to make birdie," Stallings said.

"I was kind of disappointed coming off that bogey on 17, but the shot on 18 today was the exact same yardage as 11, it is 169 yards, it is the exact same shot and I tried to hit it the exact same way."

He would celebrate again soon after. As he made his way from the scorer's tent to the tee at 18, Stallings jogged part of the way, bringing cheers from the massive audience that surrounded the final hole.

"Running from the back of the green to the tee to go to the playoff is something I will absolutely never forget," said Stallings, who said he felt for Estes and Haas, who had been waiting "forever" on him.

"I feel like they were cheering for Bill and Bob as well, but I really felt like they were pumping me and that was huge."

Estes, who has struggled to keep his exempt status on tour, had to wait for nearly an hour after posting the 10-under par score. After making birdies on the final two holes, he spent time on the practice range, working on various parts of his game while waiting to see if there would be a playoff.

"It was a tough day, I made a lot of par saves to keep the round together, and I made six birdies and no bogeys," said Estes, who was congested most of the week, but still nearly won on tour for the fifth time and first time since 2002.

"I just did kind of what I normally do, a shortened version of a regular warmup ... .

"I felt like I did everything exactly right, I just didn't make the birdie putt on 18."

Haas, who was in the third to final group, made four birdies and one bogey. He tied Estes with a birdie on 17 and missed a short putt on 18 to finish at 10 under par.

"Obviously was disappointed with the ... result here today, but I did a lot of good things and gave myself a shot on 18 in regulation and on 18 in the playoff," said Haas, the son of longtime tour pro Jay Haas. "I just didn't make the putt."

All three players put their drives within 25 feet of the hole in the playoff, but while Haas was 23 feet away and Estes just a little closer than that, Stallings was sitting just under seven foot from the hole.

"You always expect them to make it, obviously they didn't get to where they were without being able to make putts," Stallings said. "I knew that Bill had little bit of a longer putt, but you always expect them to make it.

"When Bob missed I was kind of shocked a little bit and had to regroup and stand over it when I knew I had a chance to win."

Both Haas and Estes were close on their putts, but neither found their mark.

"I got it right on the line where I needed it to have it, but I hit it through the break," Estes said. "If I had the right speed I wouldn't put it right in. Just hit it a little too firm."

Haas added, "I felt like I hit a nice putt and maybe I pulled it, but I was disappointed that I didn't put a better roll on that one because I did know what it was going to do. I just didn't trust it in the playoff."

That left Stallings with his chance to end it. He did, with nearly the same putt he had just moments earlier to get into the playoff.

As the ball dropped into the hole, Stallings dropped his putter, threw his arms up in delight and hugged his caddy with a smile that might still be on his face.

"I was tired, it's been a long week, it's been an emotional week, and I closed my eyes when I was reading the putt," Stallings said. "I took a deep breath and visualized the ball going in the hole and it was great."

The renovations made to the Old White course had an effect on the field. The scores were much higher, the greens rolled true and it showed in the scores. Last year only one player didn't finish under par, and John Daly was at even par.

Only 48 of 75 finished under par this year, while 19 were over par, with a high score of 10-over 290 by Bio Kim.

No one enjoyed it more than Stallings, who will now make the trip this week to Ohio to join Tiger Woods and others at the World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational, and will be at the PGA Championship the following week in Atlanta.

Just don't ask Stallings to recall what happened after he made the winning putt.

"After the ball went in, I don't really know what happened," said Stallings, with a smile. "Everything is kind of a blur."

 Contact Brian Woodson

at bwoodson@bdtonline.com

*****

Greenbrier Classic Final Scores

By The Associated Press

Sunday

At The Old White Course, White Sulphur Springs

Purse: $6 million; Yardage: 7,274; Par 70

(x-won on the first playoff hole)

x-Scott Stallings (500), $1,080,000 70-65-66-69  270

Bill Haas (245), $528,000 71-67-65-67  270

Bob Estes (245), $528,000 69-72-65-64  270

Andres Romero (104), $226,200 71-69-66-65  271

Brendon de Jonge (104), $226,200 66-67-72-66  271

Cameron Tringale (104), $226,200 70-67-67-67  271

Jimmy Walker (104), $226,200 69-72-62-68  271

Gary Woodland (104), $226,200 65-70-67-69  271

Kyle Stanley (78), $168,000 66-75-65-66  272

Webb Simpson (78), $168,000 65-68-69-70  272

Johnson Wagner (65), $138,000 72-67-66-68  273

Chris DiMarco (65), $138,000 66-75-64-68  273

Chris Couch (65), $138,000 68-68-67-70  273

Trevor Immelman (56), $105,000 64-70-73-67  274

Scott Verplank (56), $105,000 72-66-67-69  274

John Senden (56), $105,000 70-70-65-69  274

Anthony Kim (56), $105,000 69-69-62-74  274

J.P. Hayes (49), $68,000 68-70-72-65  275

Garrett Willis (49), $68,000 72-69-69-65  275

Carl Pettersson (49), $68,000 70-70-69-66  275

Chris Baryla (49), $68,000 67-69-72-67  275

Steven Bowditch (49), $68,000 65-75-68-67  275

Chris Stroud (49), $68,000 69-71-68-67  275

David Hearn (49), $68,000 66-72-69-68  275

Chez Reavie (49), $68,000 67-69-70-69  275

Brian Davis (49), $68,000 71-64-70-70  275

Matt Bettencourt (42), $42,600 73-67-69-67  276

Brett Wetterich (42), $42,600 73-67-68-68  276

Michael Connell (42), $42,600 72-66-69-69  276

Tag Ridings (42), $42,600 71-66-69-70  276

Nick O'Hern (42), $42,600 70-68-66-72  276

Brandt Jobe (36), $32,486 68-69-73-67  277

Ben Curtis (36), $32,486 68-72-70-67  277

Blake Adams (36), $32,486 69-70-70-68  277

Adam Hadwin (0), $32,486 70-71-68-68  277

Aron Price (36), $32,486 69-67-72-69  277

Michael Letzig (36), $32,486 69-66-71-71  277

Charles Howell III (36), $32,486 68-68-70-71  277

James Driscoll (31), $25,200 69-68-73-68  278

Sergio Garcia (31), $25,200 72-69-69-68  278

Kenny Perry (31), $25,200 68-70-70-70  278

Ricky Barnes (31), $25,200 72-65-69-72  278

Fabian Gomez (26), $19,240 71-68-70-70  279

Keegan Bradley (26), $19,240 72-67-69-71  279

Josh Teater (26), $19,240 71-70-67-71  279

Derek Lamely (26), $19,240 65-70-72-72  279

Briny Baird (26), $19,240 69-69-69-72  279

Will Strickler (26), $19,240 67-70-69-73  279

Tom Pernice, Jr. (19), $14,430 68-70-75-67  280

Shaun Micheel (19), $14,430 72-69-71-68  280

Heath Slocum (19), $14,430 68-72-71-69  280

Jeff Overton (19), $14,430 74-67-70-69  280

Steve Flesch (19), $14,430 71-68-71-70  280

Chris Kirk (19), $14,430 72-69-69-70  280

Andre Stolz (19), $14,430 69-69-70-72  280

D.A. Points (19), $14,430 71-67-67-75  280

Tommy Gainey (13), $13,380 70-70-71-70  281

Steve Allan (0), $13,380 71-68-70-72  281

Ryuji Imada (13), $13,380 69-70-68-74  281

John Merrick (13), $13,380 69-67-68-77  281

Kent Jones (9), $12,960 69-69-74-70  282

Troy Matteson (9), $12,960 69-70-71-72  282

Jim Herman (9), $12,960 67-71-70-74  282

Matt Weibring (7), $12,660 70-70-71-72  283

Spencer Levin (7), $12,660 70-68-68-77  283

Billy Horschel (3), $12,240 71-70-72-71  284

Cameron Beckman (3), $12,240 71-68-72-73  284

Jeff Quinney (3), $12,240 71-70-69-74  284

Tom Gillis (3), $12,240 71-69-70-74  284

Duffy Waldorf (3), $12,240 69-70-69-76  284

Camilo Villegas (1), $11,820 71-66-77-71  285

Joseph Bramlett (1), $11,820 72-69-72-72  285

Erik Compton (0), $11,580 73-67-73-73  286

Billy Mayfair (1), $11,580 65-73-71-77  286

Bio Kim (1), $11,400 71-70-74-75  290

August 1, 2011 Notable quotes from The Greenbrier The Register-Herald Mon Aug 01, 2011, 12:58 AM EDT

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS  "Yeah, I need to go try to get a little something to eat, because if there is a playoff, it'll be about an hour from now. So I need to try to get a little something to eat and rest a little bit and conserve some energy before going to hit a few balls."

 Bob Estes on his thoughts about a potential playoff after his round Sunday

"Honestly, it wasn't that enjoyable of a round because I had so many mistakes. It was fun when I made the turn. I made a little comeback. But after that it was kind of a struggle."

 Webb Simpson on his

final round Sunday

"It was huge. It was a struggle all day. Really didn't feel like I played that bad, just was a really tricky day for us in the last group with the wind. So to finish birdie-birdie was huge heading into (Sunday)."

 Simpson on a strong third-round finish Saturday

"Any time you're in contention on Sunday it's fun. That's what we're out here to do. Unfortunately, I didn't get enough to go in today. Save em for next week."

 Gary Woodland

"The one on 17 was really the only one I swung hard at (Saturday), and I missed it. I'm trying to go 80 percent. I have a lot of power in the lower body, it's pretty stable down there, and I fire through it pretty hard."

 Woodland on his

powerful golf swing

"It's just something  I always wear black on Sunday just because that was a terrible day. It was a great day because it was Easter and all of the meaning that actually goes along with that, but it's just something I always wear."

 Blake Adams on wearing black every Sunday in tribute to his father after his father's passing in 2004

"I hit the spa a few times; like it a lot. I like the massage. But last year I did some skeet shooting. That was a blast. Didn't get over there this year. But everything is great here."

 Cameron Tringale on his favorite amenities at

The Greenbrier

"Yeah, played easy (Saturday) I thought with the  they must have watered the greens. All the greens are really soft. The flags were attackable so you could shoot (well) if you had it going."

 Tringale on the way the greens played Saturday

"I think that the most important thing (is) that the ball rolls. Maybe a bit hard, but the most important thing is that the ball rolls close really good. And, well, during the weekend I played the greens very good, and that's the key."

 Andres Romero about the greens play on Sunday

"Hats off to my caddie. He did an unbelievable job as far as just keeping me patient. You see all the low scores, and definitely when I had opportunities to make birdies, he did a great job as far as kind of pulling me back a little and making me play a little smarter."

 Scott Stallings on his caddy's help during Saturday's third round

"I was on the charter coming form Canada and as soon as you got here you saw 30 people welcome you at 4 in the morning. It's one of those like man, they definitely care about the players and they want em to have a good experience and they want 'em to come back. I have no complaints whatsover. I've had an absolute blast, and I can't wait to come back."

 Stallings on his experience at The Greenbrier

"The golf course felt like it was a little bit softer (Sunday) than it had been and easier to get the ball closer to the hole."

 Brendon de Jonge on his final round Saturday

"Yeah, you know, the course is a lot different than last year, and so it was easy to make birdies. Got to be a little more patient this year. Sixty-seven last year wasn't that great; this year it's pretty good"

 Chris Couch on the difference on how Old White TPC played from last year's event

 Quotes compiled by Register-Herald Reporter Nick Brockman

Brand keeps sense of humor despite disappointing round July 29, 2011 @ 12:00 AM

ANDREW RAMSPACHER

The Herald-Dispatch

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. -- His drive sailed 252 yards to a patch of matted down rough, which bordered the right side of the 10th fairway.

A couple of volunteers guarding the spectator rope watched it land and pointed Christian Brand to his ball.

"Did I hit ya?," Brand asked.

"No," they responded.

"Then I missed," he said with a smile.

The former Marshall University standout and West Virginia Amateur champ didn't perform as well as he might have liked in round one of The Greenbrier Classic, but he sure had fun doing it.

"You're in your home state and you don't want to be out there complaining," said the Charleston native after shooting an 8-over, 78. "You want to keep your image up and make sure that everyone sees you're having a good time no matter how you're doing."

Brand was doing his best on the challenging par-3, 18th.

After an afternoon start on No. 10, he managed the heat and his first eight holes to come to the 18 tee box at 3-over.

A short iron later and he picked up some momentum heading to his back nine.

Brand worked his approach on the 18th within 16 feet of the pin. With a pro-Marshall gallery watching, he then sunk the putt for his first and only birdie of the day.

Brand tipped his hat and grinned.

"That was good," said his father, Mark Brand. "And I'm glad I was there for that.

"We're going to see a lot more of those tomorrow."

Unfortunately, his second nine didn't pick up where his first started.

Brand bogeyed holes Nos. 1-3, made a par at No. 4, then bogeyed Nos. 5-7.

He can blame the putter.

From tee to green, the NCAA Regional participant was OK. Brand hit 9 of 14 fairways (going over 300 yards four times) and 10 of 18 greens.

But with the flat-stick, he was a bit erratic, piling up 36 putts, including a trio of three-putts.

"I hit a lot of good putts right where I wanted to," he said. "But that's the way golf is. If they don't go in, that's not your fault."

So maybe fate was against Brand's Thursday work on the moss, but his fan support remained strong throughout.

Brand had a following of about two dozen, some clad in Thundering Herd gear, that kept the mood light and the rooting passionate.

On the 17th green, a "We Are ... Marshall" cheer rained down form the grandstands.

He even got a "You Da Man" shout that's usually reserved for the likes of Tiger Woods.

"There were a lot of good moments today," Brand said. "My first hole today, off 10 tee, when they announced my name. Birding 18 with everybody there in the grandstands, that was cool.

"And yeah, the 'We Are ... Marshall' chant was another one."

For his father, the moments are forever etched in his mind.

"It was great," said Mark Brand, who was on Christian's bag for the amateur win. "But it's tough. It's a completely different level. He has to cut his teeth on it.

"I'm sure he'll play better tomorrow."

Brand will go off on No. 1 at 8:40 a.m., Friday.

July 25, 2011 Youth will be served Greenbrier Classic Youth Day set for Tuesday at The Greenbrier By Jim Workman Assistant Managing Editor The Register-Herald Mon Jul 25, 2011, 12:32 AM EDT

BECKLEY  Before the big event takes place on the Old White TPC course, a fortunate group of area youth will tee it up just like the pros.

And with the pros.

The Greenbrier Classic Youth Day will welcome children to the famed resort in White Sulphur Springs with a clinic and The First Tee Scramble Tuesday before PGA TOUR tournament play Thursday through Sunday.

"We had over 800 kids participate in the clinic last year," said Mike Mays, executive director of The First Tee of West Virginia. "We expect another good turnout this year."

Craig Buchanan, of Oak Hill, Dakota McComas, of Shady Spring and Nelson Whyte, of Beckley, received some final instructions and practice time Wednesday at The First Tee of West Virginia headquarters in Beckley.

"It's exciting for me, and it's exciting for Rich Kissinger (the director of golf for The First Tee of West Virginia), who works with these kids on a regular and daily basis," Mays said. "It's overwhelming to have this opportunity and be a part of The Greenbrier Classic. It gives the kids some exposure and allows them to not only showcase their golf skills, but what fine young men and women we have in The First Tee program.

"It is a short hole scramble, but it will give some kids interaction with some of the PGA TOUR pros," Mays added. "These kids were selected not only because of their abilities to play golf, but the number of years that they've been involved with The First Tee program and how far they've progressed through our educational curriculum."

Buchanan admitted he has a few butterflies as he looks forward to the event.

"I'm going to be really nervous with everyone watching, plus playing with the pros," he said. "They really don't mess up a lot. I'm just excited to be able to play with a pro and play the course.

"The First Tee has really helped me get better in golf and with life skills. It's helped me mature in many ways," he added. "We got our tickets, so we'll be there every day probably."

McComas said he hopes to shake off the nerves and enjoy the experience.

"I watch the PGA TOUR a lot," he said. "This will be my first time (playing Old White TPC). Everybody feels pressure, but we'll have fun with it.

"I'm looking forward to it. I would have liked to play in it last year, but this year will be just as fun."

A youth from the Roanoke chapter of The First Tee will also participate.

Boo Weekley and Rocco Mediate are scheduled to present during the clinic portion Tuesday morning.

 E-mail: jworkman@

register-herald.com

July 10, 2011 Justice helps celebrate Brand's title By Dave Morrison Sports Editor The Register-Herald Sun Jul 10, 2011, 12:15 AM EDT

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS  Nobody was happier for first-time West Virginia Amateur champion Christian Brand  with the exception of the golfer and his immediate family, perhaps  than The Greenbrier owner Jim Justice.

Justice was on hand to watch the final hole and congratulate Brand, and then he watched the final playoff hole for second place between Hurricane dentist Sam O'Dell and Fairmont's Jess Ferrell.

Justice and Brand share a common bond after all.

Both played golf at Marshall.

"I played at Marshall for three years and was captain of the team twice," Justice said Friday, right after Brand had won the Amateur. "It was really heartwarming to see a Marshall grad come in and (win). But I didn't play like these guys, not even on my best days."

Maybe not, but Justice played in the Amateur, years before he owned the resort, and he has one special memory.

"I remember it just like it was yesterday. I was probably 14 for 15 years old, maybe 13 or 14, and I shot 71," he said. "I had a putt for 69 on the last green on Old White, and I thought, I've got to make this.'

"I putt it and knocked it 6 feet back, and I miss it coming back and end up shooting 71. Then Barney (Thompson) is out there on the course, and he's 17 or 18, and he shoots 63 the first day. Nobody touched him."

Nobody really touched Brand after he took a five-shot lead after round three and won by nine.

But Ferrell and O'Dell provided a thrilling finish, set up the night before when Justice announced that he was adding a second exemption for The Greenbrier Classic, because it will be held over the week of the Fourth of July (July 2-8) next year. The champion had his pick of playing this year or next, and Brand took this year.

Ferrell won the playoff, and the 18-year-old will play in the 2012 event.

Here's a little inside information: Justice was prophetic when he told me he was going to make the second exemption.

"If there is a tie for that second-place spot (Brand was up by 5)," Justice said Thursday afternoon, "I'd like to see it decided on the course."

That's exactly what happened.

June 29, 2011 The future of golf Top Flite Tour makes stop at The Resort at Glade Springs By Dave Morrison Sports Editor The Register-Herald Wed Jun 29, 2011, 12:30 AM EDT

If the future of local golf is in the hands of Beckley's Isaiah Zaccheo and Oceana's Colin Bowles, then it's in good hands.

The two Top Flite Tour golfers finished second and fourth, respectively, in the 12-and-under division during the tour's stop at The Resort at Glade Springs' Cobb Course.

But it wasn't that they finished in the Top 4 as much as it was their scores.

Zaccheo shot a 77 and lost by one stroke to Huntington's Josef Dransfield, and Bowles had a 79 and finished tied for third with Wellsburg's Michael Spitak.

"I played pretty good," Zaccheo said. "I'm fine with what I did."

Bowles, still a bit shy, said he was not happy that he didn't win.

"But I did OK, I guess," he said.

Zaccheo started golfing "as soon as I could walk," he said.

"That's when I got my first set of plastic clubs. Later on, I started going with my dad to the driving range."

About that time, he was noticed by LPGA golf pro Nancy White at a range in Virginia where he lived before his parents, Jack and Alicia, moved to Beckley.

"He must have been about 3, and (White) saw that he was hitting the ball out into the fairway," Jack said. "She said he had a lot of potential, a natural swing, and asked us to bring him to some clinics."

"After that, he just took off," Alicia said.

Zaccheo, who will attend Park Middle this year, has won twice on the Top Flite Tour this year, has several second-place finishes and is second in player of the year points.

"I feel like I can be competitive every time I play," said Zaccheo, who calls Stonehaven at Glade his home course. "I want to get on with a college team and then try to play on the PGA Tour. Actually, my goal is to play in the PGA when I'm 16. I saw where Anthony Kim did that. That would be real good."

Zaccheo, who attends Calvary Assembly of God on Harper Road, begins each hole with a different Bible verse.

Bowles started at a young age, too. His father, Tony, runs Clear Fork Valley Golf Club in Oceana.

"He's been playing out there since he was a little guy," Tony said. "He'd come out and play, and he started to ask about playing in tournaments. That's the great thing about the Top Flite Tour. It gives these guys a chance to compete in a tournament atmosphere. And there are some really good golfers out here."

Bowles, who also plays basketball at Oceana Middle School, says golf is easily his favorite sport.

He, too, has professional aspirations.

"I want to play on the PGA Tour," said Bowles, currently seventh in the points standings for player of the year.

Over 120 golfers took part in the event Tuesday.

It's been a labor of love for director Larry Martin for 28 years.

"It's a quality program, here and all over the United States," Martin said. "But the thing we always like to say is, this is a West Virginia program run by West Virginians. Everything we have is donated, and everything we get goes right back into the program."

Evan Smith, of Bluefield, had the United Bank Round of the Day with a 71 and won the 15-16 age group. Landon Perry, of Daniels, finished tied for second and Isaac Judy, of Lindside, was 10th. Craig Buchanan tied for 11th.

Oak Hill's Nathaniel Begley finished fifth (75) in the 17-18 division while Benjamin McMillion, of Lewisburg, was ninth (77).

The Resort at Glade Springs' golf professional Justin Beard and his staff ran the operation Tuesday, which included lunch right before the awards ceremony. They even managed to hold off the rain until the final hole of the tournament.

The Top Flite Tour moves to the Meadows course at The Greenbrier resort Wednesday.

Dave Walsh: The Greenbrier Resort hosts West Virginia Golf Symposium April 16, 2011 @ 11:00 PM

The Herald-Dispatch

The West Virginia Golf Association held its first West Virginia Golf Symposium on Thursday and Friday at The Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs. Visitors received information about the key roles and services offered by the association to its Member Clubs, including championships, series events, handicapping services, plus more.

The highlight was a presentation from guest speaker Henry DeLozier, president of Global Golf Advisors. His talk centered around strategies members clubs can use to better adapt to golf in the 21st century. A "go to" resource on matters of golf-related resort and residential investment and development, DeLozier is often called upon for comment on social and economic trends particular to the golf business. The symposium wrapped up Friday afternoon with golf on the resort's Greenbrier course.

Who says there's no Justice? By Dave Poe at dpoe@newsandsentinel.com

Thank you, Jim Justice.

Thank you for restoring The Greenbrier to its much-deserved status as a world class resort.

Thank you for bringing a major sports event to West Virginia.

Thank you for having our state cast in a positive light on national television for four straight days.

By all accounts, The Greenbrier Classic was a rousing success.

Save for Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson - who skipped the event -and the senior golfers who rightfully wanted to play for their U.S. national championship, the rest of America's top pros gathered at The Greenbrier for a week-long competition.

They tore up Old White, as we figured they would. After all it is called OLD White for a reason and modern-day golfers, thanks to improved equipment and physical training (the former much more than the latter), can drive the ball much further than their predecessors. Thus, the course was no match for the considerable skill on display.

But that hardly mattered.

What mattered is that West Virginia showed the rest of the world it can put on a first-class event.

Justice also showed the golf world that golf doesn't have to be the only attraction of the week.

By day, The Greenbrier was all about the golf.

By night, it was all about musical concerts featuring the likes of Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood.

Justice always has been a trendsetter.

Perhaps other PGA venues will follow his lead and attempt to draw more than just the golf crowd to their town.

The best thing about what took place from Thursday through Sunday is that West Virginia was in the national spotlight not for some tragedy or natural disaster but because it was the epicenter of the golf world.

The coverage displayed our state's beauty and there is no better part of the state to show off that valuable commodity than Greenbrier County.

Let's hope this isn't a one-year wonder.

Let's hope the PGA comes back.

Maybe even Tiger and/or Phil eventually will give in and make their way here.

But not even their much-noted absences could take away from what was a great week for the Mountain State.

Again, thanks, Jim Justice.

Contact Dave Poe at dpoe@newsandsentinel.com

August 1, 2010 Justice prevailed at Greenbrier Classic By Dave Morrison Register-Herald Sports Editor

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS  If you can't get inspired, or motivated, when listening to Jim Justice speak, you might want to take your pulse, or check your heart.

As eventual runner-up Jeff Overton was hitting on No. 3, Gentleman Jim, owner of The Greenbrier, was holding a press conference in the media room of the Greenbrier Classic.

The man was there to say thank you. To the state, to his outstanding team, to the fans, the players and yes, even the media.

"I thank all of you from the bottom of my heart," he told the assembled media. "You're a really big part of it, and I really appreciate you."

He had several great quotes and a lot of good information Sunday afternoon.

Justice said next year he will likely give exemptions to both the State Amateur champion as well as the State Open champion.

"We thought about he West Virginia Open (champion), and we were going with that, and I thought, really and truly, we need an amateur in this event," Justice said. "So we went that way. I think we'll do 'em both next year. I think we'll do 'em both, yeah. You know, I think we'll do 'em both."

He was asked about his week, which included playing a round of golf with John Daly in Wednesday's Pro-Am and introducing Brad Paisley Saturday night at the concert in Fairlea.

"Well, sure it's been enjoyable," Justice said. "I mean, that's for sure. It was fabulously enjoyable to play with John Daly and to introduce Brad Paisley and to get to hug Carrie Underwood. It was all really good. It was great."

Justice also turned to state natives to help him run the state's first PGA TOUR event, guys like Tim McNeely (the tournament director) and Kelly Shumate (superintendent).

"We were struggling," Justice said. "And of all places, we go to Brier Patch, a little golf course that I own over in Beckley, and the guy who is over there taking care of the greens and stuff over there and does a magnificent job, Kelly Shumate. So I bring Kelly over here and I say, ‘Kelly, we gotta go now.' And everybody vapor locked.

"Between Kelly Shumate, Bob Cochran and Joey Cochran  you know, they're my right-hand guys, they've been with me a long time  I know what they're capable of. They work. They work from daylight till dark. The condition of the course, I mean, they pulled it off and they pulled it off magnificently.

"Tim McNeely's done a magnificent job. Tim's worked hard all year in player recruitment and everything."

Other topics Justice addressed included:

n On the economic impact of the tournament: "I've heard like 92 gazillion. When the economic impact of this whole thing comes out, it'll be incredible. That's all there is to it. (It may be) the biggest event that's ever happened to West Virginia."

n On the trophy which will stay at the resort: "I'm not going to be good at what it's made out of (crystal and silver) but I know what it cost. It cost $220,000. It's made out of really, really special stuff. We came up with the idea and the idea was (The Greenbrier's iconic) Spring House."

n On bringing a major to the Old White course: "I told (PGA) Commissioner (Tim) Finchem I won't stop till they come to me and tell me this is the best event they have on the PGA TOUR. Now I'm telling you there's a lot of stuff right now that they're already saying it is the best that they have. But to have a major here, we'd probably have to add a little more length, and there are ways to do that out there; maybe pinch in the fairways a little bit and toughen it up just a little bit.

"But really and truly, look at the support. We had 41,000 people here yesterday. And we had back-to-back concerts with 50,000-plus. The first night we had, I think, 32,000. Look at the first day when we came out on a Monday Pro-Am and all the pros were coming in saying, ‘What's going on here? We've never seen this many people at a Monday Pro-Am.'

"President's Cup, a major, we're way down the road. We want to walk a little before we run. Let's step away from this and clean up our mistakes. But we've batted a pretty good batting average here."

n On the field for this year's event and looking ahead to next year: "In all honesty, I knew it was going to happen (no Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson or Ernie Els in the field). And I'll promise you to the Lord above that there are players sitting at home saying, ‘Why in the world did we not go to this event?' I mean, you would have to. Look at the people.

"Not to take away from other events that are going on, but you've seen events where there's nine people walking around. And these players love the fans and they have to be talking.

"Next year I think it'll get better and better. I would say right off the get-go, it's better this way. It's better. If we had Phil and Tiger and everybody in the world here right now, what could we look forward to? Let's walk before we run."

n On the traffic problems at Saturday night's Carrie Underwood-Brad Paisley concert: "What happened (Saturday) night was just this: Everybody was supposed to have a badge and a ticket to come to the concert. Well, all of a sudden we've got 20,000 people that show up and they're trying to buy tickets. Well, we've got another 40,000 who have badges and everything. Well, we didn't expect that to tell you the truth. Nobody did. And when they called Jeff Kmiec, our general manager, said, ‘We finally locked it down.' Well, we did. We had everything locked up last night."

And they've certainly locked down an event that, based on popularity alone, isn't that short of a major. It's certainly major in this state.

July 26, 2010 Justice swinging back into action By BRIAN WOODSON Bluefield Daily Telegraph

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS  Justice has prevailed at The Greenbrier.

More than 30 years ago, The Greenbrier had a part in ending the golf career of Jim Justice.

It didn't, however, end his love affair with the game.

"I am a golfer at heart," said Justice, the owner of The Greenbrier and creator of the inaugural Greenbrier Classic. "I had a pretty tough injury, it happened in 1976. I was playing here in the state amateur and I dislocated my shoulder. That was the last round of competitive golf I ever played."

After years away from the sport  which Justice played in college at Tennessee and Marshall  he recently picked up the game again, but only so he'll be able to tee if up Wednesday in the Sam Snead Celebrity-Pro-Am, one day before The Green-brier Classic begins on the Old White course.

"I started back trying to play about two months ago. I just hold my shoulder in tight and it feels now like you have beat it with a meat tenderizer because I played (Thursday)," Justice said. "I am actually trying really hard to get it where I can at least go out there and just beat it around and just enjoy the day.

"I am not going to break any records as far as scoring."

Justice grew up playing golf, and proved to be good at it. Justice said he won the West Virginia Junior Amateur twice in the late 1960s, and he went on to spend one school year at Tennessee and the rest at Marshall, playing golf all the way through.

It was as a youth golfer that the 59-year-old Justice first visited The Greenbrier. He was raised in a hard-working, but poor family, one so poor that he doesn't remember his grandparents on his mother's side ever having indoor plumbing.

No wonder The Greenbrier wasn't on his family's list of regular destinations.

"The first time I was ever able to come here, I guess I was 11 or 12," Justice said. "I played a lot of junior golf, and I was really and truly pretty daggone decent as a young player so I got to come here to play in our state amateur and that was really the first time I ever got to come here."

He had dreams of professional golf, but reality quickly set in after his collegiate career came to an end.

"Probably like every kid that was the thing, but reality was I just wasn't good enough to be able to do that," Justice said. "I'm just telling it like it is, I was a really good junior golfer, a decent college golfer, but it takes exceptional talent to be able to be a PGA player."

Those dreams, if not already shattered by reality, were dashed in 76 when Justice hurt his left shoulder during the West Virginia Amateur at the Greenbrier.

"It was really a bizarre injury, I went all over the country with people trying to figure out what to do," Justice said. "I loved golf and surely wanted to get it fixed, but it was really bizarre."

Golf was no longer an option for him, but everything else was. His shoulder was fine for every activity, except for swinging a golf club.

"I could play other sports and I could play basketball. I was really involved in playing a lot of really competitive basketball," said Justice, who finds time in his busy schedule to coach girls basketball at Greenbrier East High School.

"I loved basketball, and it never bothered me. I could shoot left-handed, right-handed, it didn't bother me, and I loved hunting and fishing and in September ('76) I got married to my beautiful wife Cathy.

"It just never bothered me, but every time I picked a golf club up and hit a golf ball, down I would go."

Too bad it wasn't 20 years later and perhaps he could have continued to swing the sticks. Still, he's not complaining. He turned his attention to commerce, and is now the owner of an amazing 47 businesses in six states, including The Greenbrier, which he purchased in May of 2009.

"It was dislocated both ways, it was a very difficult surgery," said Justice, who has two children, Jim III and Jill, and has been married to Cathy for almost 34 years. "At the time it was a seven-hour surgery and they said you would lose some mobility in your arm.

"Today it would be a piece of cake to fix, especially if you were 26 years old, but I just really didn't play, I didn't play for almost 30 years."

He is back, but still doesn't plan to play much. He will leave that to the pros.

"I started back trying to play a little bit," Justice said. "You try to hold your shoulder in to protect your shoulder and you bunt it down the fairway compared to how you used to hit it, but I surely miss it."

Justice will try to "bunt" his way around the course in the pro-am. He doesn't have any idea who he will play, but will find out on Tuesday evening when the pairings are announced.

"I am going to draw right out of the hat just like everybody else," Justice said. "It wouldn't be Jim Justice to say I am going to play with (Phil) Mickelson if he comes.

"I am just going to just draw out of a hat and just play like everybody else."

Justice has no hard feelings for Tiger Woods or Mickelson, neither of whom chose to play this week. Perhaps they'll make it in 2011.

"We have already got a terrific field, the only two players that we don't have right now that we would really love to have would be Mickelson and Tiger," said Justice, who was still holding hope for Mickelson at week's end. "Tiger has got so many complex things going on in his life, he has a whole host of things he needs to try and get straightened out

"Mickelson has got some real tough things he is dealing with too like (his wife) Amy. He probably commits years out on what he can do. In the beginning he absolutely told us he would come, but that is subject to how Amy is doing and we'll just wait and see if he is able to pull that off.

"If he can't we will wish him the very best with Amy and hope to see him next year."

When the tournament opens for real on Thursday, no one will be more excited than Justice himself.

"I can't wait," he said. "It is going to be spectacular."

Justice has picked a "magic" number that might prove to be the winning score on the 7,031-yard, Par-70 course, and while not in the position to pick a favorite, he does like Kenny Perry. Perry will donate $2,500 from every birdie he gets to the victims of the Montcoal mining tragedy.

"I think if it rains and it gets soft, these guys are good enough that they can go at pins everywhere," Justice said. "If we don't have rain or whatever, I think ultimately the score is going to be 11 or 12 under to win it."

While golf  after fishing and hunting  is possibly the most popular participatory sport in America, Justice said there is a reason why the PGA slogan, "these guys are good" applies to the 150-plus professionals that will tee off this week at The Greenbrier.

"In life I believe you have to have incredible passion for what you do, if you don't have that passion, I mean incredible passion, then you probably won't be great at what you do," Justice said. "I played with a lot of people that had incredible drive and a real passion for what they were doing, when the flag goes up, you have got to perform and perform under pressure.

"There is just a very select few that are able to really gather themselves and really handle that level of pressure because it is intense no matter who you are, to be able to especially perform around the greens and with the short game, that is the difference."

For the first three days at The Greenbrier, the players will be practicing, working on their games, and enjoying the Wednesday pro-am. That all changes the next day.

"I have played with a lot of players, Monday through Wednesday, you could take them out and play $2 Nassaus and rob them," Justice said. "All of a sudden when the flag went up on Thursday, they would beat your brains out. It is really a unique characteristic that the great golfers have.

"There (are) a billion players out there that can stand and hit a 7-iron 165 yards and knock the flag down with it, but when the real pressure is on, how many of them can really stand over a 12-foot putt and make it.

"You're even seeing that now with Tiger, from a mental standpoint. It just takes an incredible level of concentration, discipline, and the ability to handle that level of stress, there are only a few that can do it."

Justice will learn a little bit about how the pros feel on Wednesday. He will try to play a little golf, and will be doing it in front of what he hopes is a huge crowd. Even if they won't necessarily there to see him.

"I can't wait," he said, with a laugh. "I am going to play in the pro-am so I am sure on that day we will have an extra 50- to 75,000 people here."

Contact Brian Woodson

at bwoodson@bdtonline.com

Golf part of Greenbrier Resort Lore

By Mike Whiteford, Staff writer The Charleston Gazette

Golf did not make its Greenbrier debut until 1910, long after the 1778 discovery that the area's mountain springs brought soothing relief to sufferers of chronic rheumatism. By Mike Whiteford, Staff writer The Charleston Gazette Advertiser Golf did not make its Greenbrier debut until 1910, long after the 1778 discovery that the area's mountain springs brought soothing relief to sufferers of chronic rheumatism.

A century ago, The Greenbrier had established itself as an out-of-the-way resort that had attracted such 19th century icons as Martin Van Buren and Henry Clay, but the place lacked a place to play golf, a sport that began exploding in national popularity with the 1894 formation of the U.S. Golf Association.

When a nine-hole layout known as the Lakeside Course opened in 1910 on The Greenbrier grounds, it was one of 267 golf courses in the nation. It was expanded to 18 holes in 1962 and is considered the most picturesque of the resort's three courses.

It came to be known as the Meadows after a 1998-99 renovation that included the addition of three holes and aesthetic upgrades to the greens, bunkers and tees.

The 18-hole Old White Course, named for the Old White Hotel that stood from 1858 to 1922, followed in 1914 and shortly thereafter played host to President Woodrow Wilson, an avid golfer, who made the trip with his wife from Washington to White Sulphur Springs in a private railroad car for an Easter vacation in 1914.

The Greenbrier Course, another 18-hole design, was completed in 1922 and underwent a Jack Nicklaus redesign in 1977. At the dedication, Nicklaus joined Baseball Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio for an exhibition.

In its first century of golf, such greats as Bobby Jones, Sam Snead, Ben Hogan, Walter Hagen, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Lee Trevino, Nick Faldo, Tom Watson and Nicklaus have played on Greenbrier courses. Watson was named pro emeritus in 2005.

Hogan, in fact, shot a 64-64-65-66-259 in the Greenbrier Open, and Snead fired a 59 on May 16, 1959, on the Greenbrier Course, prompting a congratulatory telegram from, among others, England's Queen Elizabeth. Snead was The Greenbrier's golf professional from 1936 to 1975 and was pro emeritus at the time of his death in 2002.

President Dwight Eisenhower was a regular, sometimes accompanied by Palmer, and President Richard Nixon broke 100 on the Old White. Bob Hope and Bing Crosby and the Duke of Windsor played there.

Golf did not make its Greenbrier debut until 1910, long after the 1778 discovery that the area's mountain springs brought so

golf  grnbrier clsc troph
Greenbrier Classic Custom Trophy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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